Finances

Click on one of the links below to find out more about these great funding opportunities:

Liu IR Community Fund

Overview

This program is intended to provide funding and support for undergraduate student-initiated activities that build community amongst International Relations students and that are aligned with the mandate of the Liu Institute for Global Issues. Interested students should submit a brief 1-2 page proposal as outlined below to irmajor.program@ubc.ca. Students are encouraged to meet with the IR Advisor prior to submitting their proposal and may be asked to attend a follow-up meeting to discuss the idea and budget. The goal of these meetings is to work together to try our best to find ways to support your ideas and initiatives. Funding (maximum/proposal) is available in the following categories:

  1. Speakers ($1,250) – Invite someone with special expertise to give a talk on a topic related to global issues at the Liu Institute.
  2. Conferences/Workshops ($2,500) – This category is meant for students wishing to host and organize a conference/workshop at the Liu Institute. It is not intended to provide funding for students wishing to attend conferences/workshops.
  3. Community Dialogues ($500) – For activities such as reading groups, discussion groups, movie screenings, and more!
  4. Public Outreach ($1,000) – For innovative, non-traditional ways of exploring a global issue.

Lastly, we will not approve funding towards gifts or honoraria for UBC students, staff, or faculty or for student travel or conference/event participation fees.

Proposals

Proposals will be reviewed on a batch basis with the following deadlines:

  • Oct 1st, Nov 1st, Dec 1st, Feb 1st, Mar 1st, Apr 1st, July 1st

Proposals should be put together by a team of at least two International Relations Major or Minor students. Any additional students on the team do not have to be International Relations students. Proposals should include the following:

  1. Name, email, phone number, student number, and program of study of each student on the organizing team.
  2. 1-2 page outline of the proposed activity including (but not limited to):
    1. Description of activity
    2. Benefits of the activity
    3. Budget – including whether or not you have or will apply for additional funding (indicate amount) from other sources.
    4. Approximate timeline for implementation of project.

Additional guidelines can be found in the Liu IR Community Fund Overview 2016.

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IR Awards

A full list of all awards for UBC students (including scholarships for graduate study) can be found here. Below is a partial list of some of the awards of special interest to International Relations students.

IR Program Essay Prizes

Students wishing to compete for the prizes below should submit their essay to the International Relations Program Office, irmajor.program@ubc.ca, no later than May 7th of the academic year in which it was written. To be considered, an essay should have received a grade of at least 80%.

Mack Eastman United Nations Prize – 539

A prize, given in memory of Dr. S. Mack Eastman, is available to all students in the University. Dr. Eastman was the first Head of the History Department until 1925 when he left to become the Chief of Research in the International Labour Office in Geneva. He was instrumental in establishing the League of Nations Society of which he was Secretary. In recognition of his outstanding work and influence, the United Nations Association has endowed this prize. The prize is awarded for the best essay on a problem related to international peace and security or international cooperation in economic or social areas.

United Nations Prize – 561

A prize has been endowed by the late Annie B. Jamieson, B.A., LL.D. It is awarded to a student writing an essay on a problem relating to international peace and security or international cooperation in economic or social areas.

Other Essay Prizes

These prizes are offered by other departments at UBC or externally.

Leslie Upton Memorial Prize – 1196

Administered by the History Department This is given to a third- or fourth-year student majoring in History, Medieval Studies or International Relations (with a history emphasis) who has written the best essay in a competitive examination organized and adjudicated by the History Department.

August Larson Memorial Prize in South Asian Studies – 1229

Administered by the Asian Studies Department A prize has been endowed by Alice Larson and Joanna Larson Lehmann in memory of August Larson who had a lifelong interest in the history and culture of Asia. The award is offered, on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of Asian Studies, to a first or second year student writing the best course essay on some aspect of South Asian history or culture. Instructors in Anthropology, Asian Studies, History, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, or other departments may nominate candidates, or students may submit essays directly.

Claire Goddard Memorial Prize – 1231

Administered by the Political Science Department A $125 prize has been endowed in memory of Claire Goddard. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Political Science, for the best in class essay, submitted in any course in Political Science, on the subject of Australasian affairs.

(Not available in 2017) Francis V. LUMB Prize – 1209

A prize ohas been endowed through a gift in memory of F. V. Lumb, a prominent British Columbia business and civic figure, whose generous and critical spirit inspires many. The prize is awarded on the recommendations of the Departments of Political Science, History, Economics, and Anthropology and Sociology, to an undergraduate student who writes the best course essay incorporating a critique of modern capitalism in its national or international dimensions. The award is withheld if no suitable essays are submitted.

Sir Winston Spencer Churchill Scholarship Foundation Essay Prizes – External

Administered by the Churchill Society of British Columbia two prizes of up to $2,000 have been established by the Foundation. The prizes are awarded to undergraduates taking courses in History, International Relations, or Political Science. Each year six course essays, selected by a faculty committee representing the above-mentioned programs, will be forwarded to the Foundation’s Education Committee for adjudication. Although essays on any important topic of contemporary political relevance are eligible, preference will be given to essays related to Churchill’s life and times or examining issues with which he was especially concerned. Possible topics include: deterring aggression, war-time diplomacy, post-war reconstruction, political leadership, the regulation of international trade, colonialism and post-colonialism, international environmental policy, etc. Essays should be submitted by May 7th to the International Relations Program. By entering the competition, candidates agree to allow the international Churchill Society to publish the essay or extracts in their quarterly publication. Awards will be withheld if essays fail to reach the required standard.

Gunn Award for Best Historical Essay on International Migration in Canada ($1000) – External

In their effort to preserve the legacy of Canada’s immigration history and to support continued excellence in research in Canada on international migration, the International Migration Research Centre (IMRC) and the Canadian Immigration Historical Society (CIHS) are jointly offering a $1000 award for a fourth-year or graduate-level research paper on the historical evolution of Canadian immigration policy or a historical analysis of Canadian immigration related to specific places, events, or communities.

The Gunn Award for the best historical essay on international migration in Canada is an interdisciplinary award, and will therefore consider papers from any discipline in the social sciences and humanities (e.g. sociology, political science, global studies, history, communication studies, etc.) that addresses international migration in Canada from a historical perspective. The award is national and will accept applications from graduating fourth-year students and graduate students enrolled in Canadian universities, in either French or English, from across the country. The paper will be reviewed by a committee made up of IMRC and CIHS associates/members. The award will be conferred jointly by the IMRC and the CIHS and will be given out annually in the fall. Please submit electronically to imrc.wlu@gmail.com by May 31. More information can be found here.

Other Awards

The following awards do not require an application and will be allocated to students by the International Relations Program:

Gerald N. Savory Prize in International Relations – 640

A prize is awarded to the outstanding graduating major in the International Relations Program. Both academic accomplishments and contributions to international relations-related activities in the community will be considered in choosing the recipient. The prize is in memory of Gerald N. Savory who was Director of Public Affairs Programs in the UBC Centre for Continuing Education from 1964 to 1982 and held local and national offices in the United Nations Association of Canada. His dedication to international development and peace was exemplary.

Gerald Savory Scholarship in International Relations – 641

A scholarship is awarded to the outstanding third year major in the International Relations Program. Both academic accomplishments and contributions to international relations-related activities in the community will be considered in choosing the recipient. The scholarship is in memory of Gerald N. Savory who was Director of Public Affairs Programs in the UBC Centre for Continuing Education from 1964 to 1982 and held local and national offices in the United Nations Association of Canada. His dedication to international development and peace was exemplary.

Jessie Evelyn Drew Clark Memorial Scholarship – 1149

A scholarship, endowed by a bequest from Jessie E. Clark, is awarded to a woman student in the field of International Relations.

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